Agriculture – Can we get over the polarizing discussions of the past?

Can we get over the polarizing discussions of the past?

Can we get over the polarizing discussions of the past?

“Will agriculture become more ecological or more efficient?” – Can we get over the polarizing discussions of the past, and just ask in how far and why more ecological is more efficient? “Will it define its markets globally or locally?” – Why not discussing the interplay between both, and the often observable occurrence of nested markets, and – most importantly – of the diverse marketing strategies of many farmers? Can we get over simplification? “Where must the state intervene?” – Good question! How can we for example foster the societal benefits of healthy food and a healthy diet? “Will we need to raise the price of food in the first world to increase its value?” – Again, why not differentiating a bit more and connecting the question more directly with the previous one about societal benefit and – just an example 😉 – SDGs.

https://www.worldfoodconvention.com/

Karlheinz Knickel

Visit the Sustainable Agriculture discussion:

Advertisements

Resistance to last-ditch antibiotic has spread farther than anticipated

Eighteen months ago, a gene that confers resistance to colistin — known as an ‘antibiotic of last resort’ — emerged in bacteria from pigs in China. Since then, the resistance gene, called mcr-1, has been found around the world at an alarming rate, according to several presentations at the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana, last week.

In some places, nearly 100% of farm animals carry mcr-1, and an increasing number of people do as well. The gene’s spread is one of the clearest examples of how antibiotic use on farms can lead to resistance in human infections, says Lance Price, an antibiotic researcher at George Washington University in Washington

 

 

https://www.nature.com/news/resistance-to-last-ditch-antibiotic-has-spread-farther-than-anticipated-1.22140

View From the Paddock

22 May 2017, 5 p.m.

News

Farmers everywhere will tell you that as much as anything, they are all too often in a race against time – whether mustering stock or harvesting

Freelance journalist and consultant, Peter Lewis.

Freelance journalist and consultant, Peter Lewis.

I recently was privileged to travel to South Africa with the Australian contingent taking part in the annual Congress of the International Federation of Agricultural Journalists (IFAJ) – the peak body representing the world’s rural journalists, broadcasters and photographers.

It’s an opportunity for many of us to step away from the pressures and priorities of deadlines for a few days and gain some insight and understanding into how our international colleagues confront the same challenges and opportunities as we all do

http://www.queenslandcountrylife.com.au/story/4679198/no-time-to-lose-in-farming-world/?cs=4698

Can cover crops clean up the Corn Belt? | New Food Economy

Iowa’s got a water quality problem, and cover crops could help. But it will mean convincing 50,000 corn and soy farmers to diversify their fields.May 11th , 2017by Laura Sayre ENVIRONMENT FARM HEALTHTo understand Iowa’s water problem, just follow the Raccoon River as it connects the country to the city, flowing south and east towards Des Moines. For more than a hundred years, Iowa’s state capital has relied on the Raccoon for its drinking water. But before it gets there, the river’s three tributaries first travel through some of the most productive farmland in the United States.

Source: Can cover crops clean up the Corn Belt? | New Food Economy

Dung beetles research

 

 

Mike Foley
Mike Foley@micksfoley

19 May 2017, 11 a.m.

More than $9 million in funding is available for new research to extend the benefits of dung beetles. More work is needed to establish species adapted to colder climates and sheep dung.

More than $9 million in funding is available for new research to extend the benefits of dung beetles. More work is needed to establish species adapted to colder climates and sheep dung.

Excrement consumption might not seem the most obvious choice for federal government funding.

But the latest round of the Agriculture Department’s Rural Research and Development for Profit Program is doing just that, flushing $9.2 million into a five year dung beetle research project lead by CSIRO

http://www.stockjournal.com.au/story/4668980/profit-in-poo-for-people-pastures/

Science Protecting Plant Health 2017

MAY 18, 2017 / EDIT

Welcome

We would like to invite you to Science Protecting Plant Health 2017, to be held at the Brisbane Convention Centre, Queensland Australia, from 26-28 September 2017.

We are pleased to present an international event and host a joint conference of the Australasian Plant Pathology Society and the Plant Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre.  We will present an exciting and invigorating scientific programme that will appeal to a broad audience of researchers, students, educators and policy makers.

Conference themes will focus on the latest science, research and practice from leaders in their fields encompassing all the disciplines of plant biosecurity, plant pathology and entomology. Recent developments, as well as future advances, will be showcased at this peak event, with presentations by international, national and local speakers in a well-rounded program augmented by poster presentations and an exciting social schedule.

Field trips, including to the spectacular “Carnival of Flowers” in Toowoomba on the Darling Downs, are currently being planned, as is a series of workshops by expert presenters on specific disciplines.

http://www.sciplant2017.com.au/